07778 407676 / 07796 854103 info@baxinteraction.co.uk

Thomas International Psychometric Assessments

Our MD, Steve Bax, has completed training with Thomas International and is an accredited practitioner for HPTI (High Potential Trait Indicator) and a certified user of TEIQue (Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire).

TEIQue is an emotional intelligence assessment designed to help individuals to understand and manage: their emotions; how well they interpret and deal with the emotions of others and how they use this knowledge to manage relationships.

HPTI helps identify leadership potential by exploring an individual’s personality traits and provides an insight into how suited they may be for a given job role or position such as senior executive leadership.

Steve talks to Kiran Kapur on Cambridge Marketing Radio about the TEIQue assessment.

TO BE BRIEF…

In our role as marketing researchers we see briefs in all shapes and sizes. Research briefs, I hasten to add.

With the massive changes we are seeing in the world of marketing research driven by the growth in: available data; engagement channels; user generated content; new methods; new technologies; analytics; concerns over privacy and so on, it is a source of bemusement at times that written research briefs are still often scant, lacking in key information, with unclear objectives or not done at all.

This may sound like a criticism of clients and prospective clients but it really isn’t. It is just surprising that the briefing process seems to be so difficult to get right.

When teaching the subject, I always say

“Without a good brief it is nearly impossible to get a good proposal”.

In the absence of a written brief we will often write one for the client and get agreement to it prior to delivering a proposal.

So here are my five key tips for writing that all important research brief:

1. State the purpose – what decisions do you need to take as a result of the research and why do they need to be taken?

2. Write a ‘shopping list’ – what information do you need to receive at the end of the research process to make those decisions? Writing a brief in this way short circuits the process of arriving at research objectives and enables the researcher or agency to deliver that information through the proposed method(s).

3. Consider the research scope – which products, services, markets, customers, clients, prospects, geographies, demographics etc. need to be researched and why – if not clear from 1. above?

4. Outline your preferred method – what are your thoughts on the method that could be used? In general, most marketers have an initial view on how the research might be undertaken, via what channels and this can be a very good guide for developing the proposal.

5. Think about timing and cost – When is the research needed by? Yes, I know “ASAP” but think about the latest date by which the results must be available to make the decisions detailed in 1?
Also, giving at least a rough guide on likely budget and insisting that the proposed costs are fully broken down so that you can see where your money would be spent is really worth considering.

Good luck with creating effective research briefs.

Radio interview with Cambridge Marketing College on Thomas HPTI (High Potential Trait Indicator) Assessments


The second part of my radio interview with Kiran Kapur, CEO of Cambridge Marketing College. This time I am talking about the Thomas International HPTI (High Performance Trait Indicator) assessment, which identifies leadership potential by exploring personality traits. The second part of the programme looks at marketing communication with the millennial generation.

Basic Social Media Mistakes

Basic Social Media Mistakes

Steve Bax‘s insight:

Good article by Keith A. Quesenberry. His key tips for success include:

1. Use broad business goals to determine your social media objectives
2. Have a multichannel social media strategy and be selective
Content needs to solve a problem, deliver a timely message or make people smile! Use emotion where appropriate.
GDPR is coming!

GDPR is coming!

The GDPR is coming.

No grace period.

Less talk more action with our new ‘GDPR Essentials’ workshops. For more details and to book click here

GDPR is not Y2K

GDPR is not Y2K

A very good pre Christmas blog by Elizabeth Denham.

GDPR is not Y2K

Her key message for organisations is:

 “By now you should be putting key building blocks in place to ensure your organisation implements responsible data practices:
1. Organisational commitment – Preparation and compliance must be cross-organisational, starting with a commitment at board level. There needs to be a culture of transparency and accountability as to how you use personal data – recognising that the public has a right to know what’s happening with their information.
2. Understand the information you have – document what personal data you hold, where it came from and who you share it with. This will involve reviewing your contracts with third party processors to ensure they’re fit for GDPR.
3. Implement accountability measures – including appointing a data protection officer if necessary, considering lawful bases, reviewing privacy notices, designing and testing a data breach incident procedure that works for you and thinking about what new projects in the coming year could need a Data Protection Impact Assessment.
4. Ensure appropriate security – you’ll need continual rigour in identifying and taking appropriate steps to address security vulnerabilities and cyber risks
5. Train Staff – Staff are your best defence and greatest potential weakness – regular and refresher training is a must”